Google+
Thursday
Aug182011

Be not afraid (of the dentist)

If you are afraid of the dentist, we truly do sympathize. We want dental care to be pleasant for you.

If fear is keeping you from seeing a dentist, remember that famous quote from former American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt. We really do have nothing to fear but fear itself. In nearly every case, the fear and anticipation are far worse than the actual dental procedure. With the many options in modern anesthesia, pain is thing of the past!

If your dentist isn’t sensitive to your fears and doesn’t support anesthesia at a level that makes you feel calm and comfortable, then find a dentist who does. Providing you with high-quality, appropriate care and making your dental visit as comfortable as possible are top priorities for the more than 155,000 dentist members of the American Dental Association (ADA).

Following are some common questions and answers related to dental anesthesia, provided by the ADA.

 

What are analgesics?

Non-narcotic analgesics are the most commonly used drugs for relief of toothache or pain following dental treatment. This category includes aspirin, acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Ibuprofen.

Narcotic analgesics, such as those containing codeine, act on the central nervous system to relieve pain. They are used for more severe pain.

 

What is local anesthesia?

Topical anesthetics are applied to mouth tissues with a swab to prevent pain on the surface level. Your dentist may use a topical anesthetic to numb an area in preparation for administering an injectable local anesthetic. Topical anesthetics also may be used to soothe painful mouth sores.

Injectable local anesthetics prevent pain in a specific area of your mouth during treatment by blocking the nerves that sense or transmit pain and numbing mouth tissues. They cause the temporary numbness often referred to as a "fat lip" feeling. Injectable anesthetics may be used in such procedures as filling cavities, preparing teeth for crowns or treating periodontal (gum) disease.

 

What is sedation and general anesthesia?

Anti-anxiety agents, such as nitrous oxide, or sedatives may help you relax during dental visits and often may be used along with local anesthetics. Dentists also can use these agents to induce "minimal or moderate sedation," in which the patient achieves a relaxed state during treatment but can respond to speech or touch. Sedatives can be administered before, during or after dental procedures by mouth, inhalation or injection.

More complex treatments may require drugs that can induce “deep sedation,” causing a loss of feeling and reducing consciousness in order to relieve both pain and anxiety. On occasion, patients undergo “general anesthesia,” in which drugs cause a temporary loss of consciousness. Deep sedation and general anesthesia may be recommended in certain procedures for children or others who have severe anxiety or who have difficulty controlling their movements.

The ADA provides guidelines to help dentists administer pain controllers in the safest manner possible. Dentists use the pain and anxiety control techniques mentioned above to treat tens of millions of patients safely every year. Even so, taking any medication involves a certain amount of risk. That's why the ADA urges you to take an active role in your oral health care. This includes knowing your health status and telling your dentist about any illnesses or health conditions, whether you are taking any medications, and whether you’ve ever had any problems such as allergic reactions to any medications.

Curtis H. Roy, D.D.S., has served Acadiana residents with a general dentistry and specialty practice since 1970. Find his practice on the Web at www.drcurtisroyandassociates.com, visit the office at 3703 Johnston St., Lafayette, or call 981.9811, and look for him on Facebook and Twitter.

 

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

References (3)

References allow you to track sources for this article, as well as articles that were written in response to this article.
  • Response
    Response: www.hansbeen.nl
    Seriously, wonderful! That will is exactly what Id like to see!
  • Response
    Response: Oakville dentist
    Dr. Curtis Roy and Associates- Lafayette, LA - Blog - Be not afraid (of the dentist)
  • Response
    Response: longchamp
    For this article. I think the authors write very well. Content lively and interesting. Details are as follows:longchamp

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>
« Cosmetic dentistry changes lives. | Main | Acid wash not just a bad fashion fad. »